8th August 2019

How we do our part to stop food waste

Summary:

  • Compass Group’s committment to stop food waste
  • How we teach and inspire
  • Measuring the results

If you are a reader of this blog, you will know we have already spoken about the disastrous social and environmental impact of food waste and about the Compass “Stop Food Waste” initiative.

Worldwide Compass has committed to reducing 50% of food waste by the year 2030, in line with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 12.3; in this article we will show how our chefs and teams across the world are doing their part by building awareness of the critical food waste problem and inspiring change. 

Teaching and inspiring

Compass country teams receive ongoing support ranging from training and tools to reduce food surplus, help in building partnerships to donate excess food to local communities, and marketing materials to raise awareness of ways to save at home. 

As nearly two thirds of the food waste is generated at home, it is important to make people aware that they can reduce this waste simply by taking the right measures. In our restaurants there are screens and posters where we show slogans like ‘Think what you Take’ where reference is made to the waste we normally have in an average day. When we organise events, posters remind our visitors about food waste and how to avoid it.

It is also important to show that food can be used in another way. 

In our restaurants our chefs prepare special dishes with leftover food; by showing how easy it is to make a meal with leftovers people understand that -also at home- they don’t have to through food away. Some of the most successful recipes have included Arancini (savoury recipes made with rice and lentils from previous day), risotto with mixed vegetables, spicy sautéed potatoes, breakfast compotes from leftover fruit, chicken legs and gratin polenta on toast converted for the salad bar. Sometimes we also have “best recipe” competitions with food waste and opportunities to create ‘take away plates’ from products that are so called overdue but are still good to eat.

But it is not just about delicious leftover recipes. Food can be reused to make more food: some of our teams reuse coffee grounds from their coffee bars to fertilize vegetable gardens or create “take home” bags of used grounds for employees’ home gardens. 

Sharing. 

Food waste is not only an environmental problem but also a social one and we are well aware of the fact that some people do not have enough food while others waste so much of it. We want to do our part to help and this is why we partner with organisations like the “Foodlink Foundation” and “Food Cloud” which collect food donations to help others.

Measuring

We need to see if our initiatives are working and we have systems in place to track and measure the results of our efforts. Efficient inventory management coupled with strategic menu planning assist our sites in reaping positive results while waste tracking tools provide analysis information which helps control any variations in ingredient waste on a daily or weekly basis.  The results are breath-taking: in the first year of Compass’ commitment to stop wasting food, throughout of our global accounts we estimate that we’ve saved over $1M in avoided food spend by reducing our waste — a greenhouse gas reduction equivalent to avoiding 60,000 gallons of gasoline.

Compass’ commitment to reduce food waste is one of the most important, impactful and influential decisions we have made. Because of our global presence, we are in the unique position of influence that can create a positive chain reaction. 

If you would like to know how Compass International Client Programme can help you reduce food waste in your organisation, you can call Jeroen Kurvers on  +31 655 860 513 to start the conversation.

The results are breath-taking: in the first year of Compass’ commitment to stop wasting food, throughout of our global accounts we estimate that we’ve saved over $1M in avoided food spend by reducing our waste — a greenhouse gas reduction equivalent to avoiding 60,000 gallons of gasoline.

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