1st October 2020

Evolution of the Employer Value Proposition

Summary:

  • Learnings and insights from Dimple Agarwal, Deputy CEO & Managing Partner for People, Deloitte
  • Passion for purpose
  • Be the true you
  • Never stop growing

Over the last few months we have seen the way we work change dramatically, and as employers look to adapt their businesses to the ‘new normal’, work will not look like it did at the start of 2020. In these unprecedented times senior leaders give us their insights into how they think the Employer Value Proposition (EVP) needs to evolve to secure talent in the future.

Dimple Agarwal – Deputy CEO and Managing Partner for People, Deloitte says: “The Employer Value Proposition is a differentiator for all organisations, and we all need to reflect on it to see what, if anything, needs to change for a new world post-COVID. We developed an employee value proposition to provide an employee experience that delivers our ambition, reflects our purpose and values, and speaks to what makes us distinctive to our people, partners, clients and society.”

"Be the true you - we want to create an environment where everyone feels a sense of inclusion, belonging and wellbeing, and can bring their whole selves to work and flourish in this environment.”

Passion for purpose

Passion for purpose – we want people to make an impact that matters and be motivated to do so and to push harder for this.

Be the true you

Be the true you – we want to create an environment where everyone feels a sense of inclusion, belonging and wellbeing, and can bring their whole selves to work and flourish in this environment.

"The ability to work from home and enabling this for more employees will be a key feature in the future.”

evolutionNever stop growing

Never stop growing – we are a people business, so developing our people’s expertise and experiences is key. We want to ensure that world-class development opportunities continue from our student joiners right through to partners in our firm.

“Flexibility within this and any EVP is key in the delivery of it: whether it be in terms of location, working hours, or periods of time out from work. It is a key feature of both securing and retaining talent. This will undoubtedly increase in the future, both for the benefit of the employee, and for employers. The benefits of having a more flexible workforce have been apparent from the pandemic, and the ability to work from home and enabling this for more employees will be a key feature in the future.

“Looking more broadly at the wider EVP, it is clear that this will need to evolve, whether it be by ensuring activity such as meetings, networking events, learning programmes, even something as big and broad as mobility – anything that previously was always face to face, can be delivered virtually, through to the way in which individuals and teams are performance managed and rewarded.”

Sarah Morris – Group Chief People Officer, Compass Groups says: “In our business the vast majority of us do not work from home, they are working on client sites, some of which are open and some of which are not. For them the shift in any employer value proposition is how we behave as an employer. Do we have a competitive differentiation based on how we’ve been perceived to behave in society – the decisions we’ve made around our people all around the world when things have been very tough. I think that’s what will drive people to come and work for somebody like us over an alternative option where the business has been perceived to not behave as well.

“I think as it relates to those people who are working from home, so our office-based colleagues, we have seen some shifts. One of the things that it makes me think about in the future is our proposition on flexible working, on caring policies, on the way in which we encourage those, because this has bust so many myths. I’ve had so many people say to me, ‘I was a die-hard anti-flexible working leader. I never believed it could be done and yet we’ve proven it’. That will mean we will have to think carefully about what we’re willing to offer people in the future as they return. As dual career families become increasingly ever more important, we’ll have to think about it not just for our employees but perhaps from the perspective of their family.”

Intersection with sustainability

“I think the intersection with sustainability is an interesting one. We know that the generation coming through is more focused than ever on that. If we were winning the war on plastics, we now know that might have to take a step back in a bid to provide a safe and secure environment, and we are thoughtful about how that intersection with sustainability is going to work as an employer value proposition in future.”

"The things that people are missing out on while working from home, are those social connections that those eating opportunities provide.”

food and social connectionsThe role of food and social connections

“The things that people are missing out on while working from home, are those social connections that those eating opportunities provide, to take some time out and have a coffee or eat with somebody. How we’re able to do that for our clients and for our people in a way that is safe, but still fosters that sense of being in a community at work will be really important, and they are all points we’re talking to our clients and colleagues about.”

If you would like to talk to someone about how Compass can support your business as you face new challenges, please contact: Jake Frank at jake.frank@compass-usa.com

“I was a die-hard anti-flexible working leader. I never believed it could be done and yet we’ve proven it”

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